Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Observation’ Category

NS Harsha is a gifted story teller who captures everyday life from India as seen through the lens of news and world events on his canvas through the medium of paints and color.

NS Harsha\'s \'The School Within\'

Miniature art form is not unknown in India. In fact, it has been used through the ages to depict life from courts of kings to humble settings of huts or villages. However, Harsha has picked up this technique to bring to the world his observations of Indian society which at times are whimsical and at times absurd, or even tragic or significant on the world scene.NS Harsha\'s Mass Marriage

Perhaps painting is just a medium to express the philosopher and the thinker in him. Perhaps brush is Harsha’s tool in an attempt to bring a social change, and awareness and curiosity that surrounds humanity.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

Arunadhati Roy\'s \'The Shape Of The Beast\'Eleven years after she won the Booker Prize for The God of Small Things, 14 conversations (2001-2008 ) with Roy on her social and political activism appear in a new book The Shape of the Beast.

Even before The God of Small Things hit the world of fame, this female Rushdie of India attracted lot of media attention when she criticised Shekhar Kapur’s film Bandit Queen, based on the life of Phoolan Devi, charging Kapur with exploiting Devi and misrepresenting both her life and its meaning. For sometime Roy was involved as film script writer as well. She even tried her hands at acting in films. Not many remember but Arundhati Roy played a village girl in the award-winning movie Massey Sahib.

(Click on the Image for a Video of an Interview with Arundhati Roy on The Shape of the Beast).

The Shape of the Beast finds Roy fulminating against the 2002 Godhra genocide, empathising with the adivasis of Dantewada in Chhattisgarh and venting against the military operations in Nagaland, Kashmir and Manipur.Through this book Roy has revealed both a personal and social journey.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

“In the silence of the night when I take a break from my work, and sit alone in the balcony, I see a young boy with a bag on his shoulder and a drawing board in his hand. Black clouds cover the sky while people take shelter from the rain, but the boy sits on the steps of the monument under an open sky – and the rain pours. The streets are full of crowds and everyone is running. He does not know for what? He is sitting on the huge iron pipes at Metro Railways, placed on the mud hills on the sides of Park Street. He sits for hours – from evening to midnight – with no one to ask for any explanation! Freedom?

(more…)

Read Full Post »

Mount Kailash Lingam

To the Hindus, the Himalayas are central to their cosmology. The peaks are the petals of the Golden Lotus which lord Vishnu created as a first step in the formation of the universe. On one of these peaks – Mount Kailash, sits Shiva in a state of perpetual meditation, generating the spiritual force that sustains the cosmos. Of the three worlds–patala (netherworld), prithvi (earth) and swargalok (heaven)–only Shiva lives on this planet and Mount Kailash is his abode.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

imagine-a-world-without-girl-child.jpgSon preference in India is a well documented fact and its implications on skewed sex ratios, female feticide and high child morality rates is no news either. For over a century India has shown marked gap in the number is boys vs girls born each year. With technological advancement this gap is only increasing.

Indians worship the goddesses in temples but kill their daughters at home. Preference for boys over girls is driven by these factors:

  • Sons are expected to provide emotional and social care to parents especially in their old age as well as are responsible for their lineage while daughters will go away to other families. It appears sons compensate for the lack of social security in India.
  • Only if the son light the funeral pyre can the parents ascend to heaven.
  • Sons add to family wealth and property, whereas daughters will drain that in the form of dowry for marriage.
  • Sons will protect the parents whereas daughters have to be protected. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Some Facts:

  • India is the only country in the world where age bar for alcohol consumption is 25 years.
  • It is illegal to directly or indirectly advertise alcoholic beverages in India.
  • Hinduism declares alcohol consumption as one of the five heinous crimes and is comparable to murder and adultery. A drunkard is a dead body, say the scriptures.
  • Broadcasting Bill of the country prohibits screening of smoking and drinking scenes and are categorized as adult.
  • A prerequisite to become a congressman is to abstain from alcohol.

Mahatma Gandhi had canvassed total prohibition, and the Constitution of India endorsed, adopted, and imposed total prohibition in 1977. It lasted only two years leaving behind a few dry states like Mizoram, Manipur and Gujarat, and a couple of ‘dry’ holidays like Gandhi Jayanti and Independence day.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

For the travelers to the mysterious land of Indian Culture we know how confusing it can be at times. It is an ancient culture rich with confusions and contradictions that we Indians learned to live with – do we have a choice. What is merely a daily matter to us, my foreign wonderer, for you it is a mystery. In the land with busy billions it is hard to find the key that would unlock the secret of the conundrum that is Indian culture. So we have put together a short phrasebook to help understand a few details about us. Here are some excerpts.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

« Newer Posts - Older Posts »